Barbara and Andy Muschietti Producing an Adaptation of Stephen King’s ‘Roadwork’

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Published under the pseudonym Richard Bachman, Stephen King‘s Roadwork was first released in 1981, later collected together with other stories in 1985’s The Bachman Books.

The book’s official description reads, “It’s all coming to an end for Barton Dawes. The city’s Highway 784 extension is in the process of being constructed right across town and inexorably through every aspect of Bart’s existence—whether it’s about to barrel over the laundry plant where he makes a living, or soon to smash through the very home where he makes a life. But as a result, something’s been happening inside Bart’s head that a heartless local bureaucracy isn’t prepared for—a complete and irrevocable burnout of the mental circuit breaker that keeps a mild-mannered person from turning to violent means. As the wheels of progress and a demolition crew continue unabated throughout Bart’s neighborhood, he’s not about to give everything up without a fight. As a matter of fact, he’s ready and waiting to ignite an explosive confrontation with the legislative forces gathered against him.”

It looks like a feature film adaptation of Roadwork is now in the works, as Andy and Barbara Muschietti (IT, IT: Chapter Two) have revealed to Radio Cantilo that they’re on board to produce an adaptation of the novel. Pablo Trapero, the site reports, will direct the film.

It’s a fantastic script,” Barbara Muschietti told the radio station. “We hope to start shooting at the beginning of next year.”

Thanks to Lilja’s Library for the heads up.

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